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Azure CLI Day 7 – site create with git

Bash azure

In my last post (http://thinkfirstcodelater.com/blog/?p=3027) I showed you how to create a Windows Azure web site from the command line. In this post I’ll show you how to create a web site that has Git enabled. I’ll also show you how to deploy updates to your site using Git. To follow along with this post you’ll need to have Git (a distributed version control system) installed. You can obtain the latest version of Git at http://git-scm.com/.

Once again, just a reminder that I’m using the command line tools on a MacBook Air with OSX (Mountain Lion) installed, and I’m using Google Chrome as my default browser. However, the experience should be identical on Windows and Linux as well.

Open an instance of your command line (Terminal, Bash, Command Prompt, etc.) and type the following:

azure site create -h

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 3.47.53 PM

This should look familiar as we saw this command in my last post. This time we’re going to use a couple of more options when creating our web site.

  1. –git. This will simply configure git on the web site.
  2. –gitusername <gitusername>. This is the username for publishing.

Next type the following, making the appropriate substitutions:

azure site create –location “[YOUR LOCATION]” –git –gitusername “[YOUR USER NAME]” “[YOUR WEB SITE NAME]“

In my case I entered:

azure site create –location “West US” –git –gitusername “adam” “antares106″

This will do the following:

  1. Create a website names antares106 in the West US region.
  2. Enable Git on the website.
  3. Use adam as the Git publishing username.

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 3.56.11 PM

During this process you might be prompted to create a password for the Git user. I was not prompted as I had already created this user for other web sites in my subscription that use Git.

If you browse to the Web Sites section of the Windows Azure management portal (http://manage.windowsazure.com) you can see your new site.

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 3.56.58 PM

If you click on the URL, you’ll be taken to my site, which currently has the out of the box page from Windows Azure.

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 3.58.35 PM

This is what we went to change. To do so we first need to clone the Git repository from the website to the local machine, and to do that we need to get the Git URL. This can be obtained by going to the dashboard for your web site in the management portal and clicking on CONFIGURE.

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.01.17 PM

Scroll down to the deployments section and copy the Git URL.

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.02.41 PM

Go back to your CLI and enter the following:

git clone [YOUR GIT URL]

In my case I entered:

git clone https://adamg@antares106.scm.azurewebsites.net:443/antares106.git

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.07.29 PM

After entering your password the clone is made. If you navigate to the directory on the file system, you will see nothing is in it. Now, open your favorite text/web editor and create a basic html page. Here’s what mine looks like:

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.10.31 PM

Save this as index.html in the directory where you cloned your web site’s Git repository.

Go back to your CLI and type:

git status

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.13.19 PM

You should see your file show up here as being untracked. The next thing we need to do is start tracking the file and commit it to our local Git repository. This can be done with the following commands.

git add *
git commit -m ‘initial commit’

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.15.21 PM

These commands start tracking the index.html file and commit the current version to the local Git repository. Next we need to push the changes from the local repository to the repository in Windows Azure. This can be done via the following:

git push origin master

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.18.43 PM

This pushes your changes to the master branch to Windows Azure (the origin).

Go back to your web site’s dashboard in the Windows Azure management portal and click DEPLOYMENTS

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.19.43 PM

Pretty cool, huh? Your changes we’re deployed via Git! You can verify this by navigating to your web site. You should now see the following page:

Screen Shot 2013-09-07 at 4.21.51 PM

In my next post I’ll show you how you can use the popular site GitHub to deploy your Windows Azure web sites.

Did you know you can try Windows Azure for free for 30 days? Just go to http://aka.ms/thecloud and sign up.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Adam Grocholski

Hey there! My name is Adam Grocholski, and I'm a Technical Evangelist at Microsoft where I spend time focusing on Windows, Windows Phone, and Windows Azure. I live in the frozen tundra of Minnesota and run thinkfirstcodelater.com. You can also follow me on twitter at @codel8r.